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Earth Continent


Seven Continent On Earth ::--Africa Continent||Asia Continent||Europe Continent||North America Continent||South America Continent||Australia Continent||Antarctica Continent.


Continent

A continent is one of several very large landmasses on Earth. They are generally identified by convention rather than any strict criteria, with seven regions commonly regarded as continents—they are (from largest in size to smallest): Asia, Africa, North America, South America, Antarctica, Europe, and Australia .
Plate tectonics is the geological process and study of the movement, collision and division of continents, earlier known as continental drift.For people in Britain and Ireland, in spite of being a part of Europe themselves, the expression "the Continent" may also refer to Continental Europe, that is, the mainland of Europe, excluding the British Isles Iceland and some other islands.

In Europe and other parts of the world, many students are taught of six continents, where North and South America are combined to form a single continent of America. Thus, these six continents are Africa, America, Antarctica, Asia, Australia, and Europe.

Many scientists now refer to six continents, where Europe and Asia are combined (since they're one solid geologic landmass). Thus, these six continents are Africa, Antarctica, Australia, Eurasia, North America, and South America.

Geographers divide the planet into regions, and generally not continents, for ease of study. Various geographers have various definitions of these world regions. This Official Listing of Countries by Region divides the world into eight regions: Asia, the Middle East and North Africa, Europe, North America, Central America and the Caribbean, South America, Africa, and Australia and Oceania.



Early concepts of the Old World continents

The first distinction between continents was made by ancient Greek mariners who gave the names Europe and Asia to the lands on either side of the waterways of the Aegean Sea, the Dardanelles strait, the Sea of Marmara, the Bosporus strait and the Black Sea. The names were first applied just to lands near the coast and only later extended to include the hinterlands. But the division was only carried through to the end of navigable waterways and "... beyond that point the Hellenic geographers never succeeded in laying their finger on any inland feature in the physical landscape that could offer any convincing line for partitioning an indivisible Eurasia ..."
Ancient Greek thinkers subsequently debated whether Africa (then called Libya) should be considered part of Asia or a third part of the world. Division into three parts eventually came to predominate. From the Greek viewpoint, the Aegean Sea was the center of the world; Asia lay to the east, Europe to the west and north and Africa to the south. The boundaries between the continents were not fixed. Early on, the Europe–Asia boundary was taken to run from the Black Sea along the Rioni River (known then as the Phasis) in Georgia. Later it was viewed as running from the Black Sea through Kerch Strait, the Sea of Azov and along the Don River (known then as the Tanais) in Russia. The boundary between Asia and Africa was generally taken to be the Nile River. Herodotus in the 5th century BC, however, objected to the unity of Egypt being split into Asia and Africa ("Libya") and took the boundary to lie along the western border of Egypt, regarding Egypt as part of Asia. He also questioned the division into three of what is really a single landmass, a debate that continues nearly two and a half millennia later.
Eratosthenes, in the 3rd century BC, noted that some geographers divided the continents by rivers (the Nile and the Don), thus considering them "islands". Others divided the continents by isthmuses, calling the continents "peninsulas". These latter geographers set the border between Europe and Asia at the isthmus between the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea, and the border between Asia and Africa at the isthmus between the Red Sea and the mouth of Lake Bardawil on the Mediterranean Sea.
Through the Roman period and the Middle Ages, a few writers took the Isthmus of Suez as the boundary between Asia and Africa, but most writers continued to take it to be the Nile or the western border of Egypt (Gibbon). In the Middle Ages the world was usually portrayed on T and O maps, with the T representing the waters dividing the three continents. By the middle of the 18th century, "the fashion of dividing Asia and Africa at the Nile, or at the Great Catabathmus [the boundary between Egypt and Libya] farther west, had even then scarcely passed away".



European arrival in the Americas

Christopher Columbus sailed across the Atlantic Ocean to the West Indies in 1492, sparking a period of European exploration of the Americas. But despite four voyages to the Americas, Columbus never believed he had reached a new continent—he always thought it was part of Asia.
In 1501, Amerigo Vespucci and Gonçalo Coelho attempted to sail around what they considered to be the southern end of the Asian mainland into the Indian Ocean, passing through the Matsackson Islands. After reaching the coast of Brazil, they sailed a long way further south along the coast of South America, confirming that this was a land of continental proportions and that it also extended much further south than Asia was known to. On return to Europe, an account of the voyage, called Mundus Novus ("New World"), was published under Vespucci’s name in 1502 or 1503 although it seems that it had additions or alterations by another writer. Regardless of who penned the words, Mundus Novus attributed Vespucci with saying, "I have discovered a continent in those southern regions that is inhabited by more numerous people and animals than our Europe, or Asia or Africa" the first known explicit identification of part of the Americas as a continent like the other three.
Within a few years the name "New World" began appearing as a name for South America on world maps, such as the Oliveriana (Pesaro) map of around 1504–1505. Maps of this time though still showed North America connected to Asia and showed South America as a separate land.
In 1507 Martin Waldseemüller published a world map, Universalis Cosmographia, which was the first to show North and South America as separate from Asia and surrounded by water. A small inset map above the main map explicitly showed for the first time the Americas being east of Asia and separated from Asia by an ocean, as opposed to just placing the Americas on the left end of the map and Asia on the right end. In the accompanying book Cosmographiae Introductio, Waldseemüller noted that the earth is divided into four parts, Europe, Asia, Africa and the fourth part which he named "America" after Amerigo Vespucci's first name. On the map, the word "America" was placed on part of South America.


Earth Continent

Area and population of Earth Continent

Continent Area (km²) Area (mi²) Percent of
total landmass
Total population Percent of
total population
Density
People per
km²
Density
People per
mi²
Most populous
city (proper)
Asia
43,820,000
16,920,000
29.5%
4,164,252,000
60%
95.0
246
Shanghai, China
Africa
30,370,000
11,730,000
20.4%
1,022,234,000
15%
33.7
87
Lagos, Nigeria
North America
24,490,000
9,460,000
16.5%
542,056,000
8%
22.1
57
Mexico City, Mexico
South America
17,840,000
6,890,000
12.0%
392,555,000
6%
22.0
57
São Paulo, Brazil
Antarctica
13,720,000
5,300,000
9.2%
1,000
0.00002%
0.00007
0.00018
Villa Las Estrellas,Chilean claim
Europe
10,180,000
3,930,000
6.8%
738,199,000
11%
72.5
188
Moscow, Russia
Australia
9,008,500
3,478,200
5.9%
29,127,000
0.4%
3.2
8.3
Sydney, Australia

The total land area of all continents is 148,647,000 square kilometres (57,393,000 sq mi), or 29.1% of earth's surface (510,065,600 square kilometres / 196,937,400 square miles).A rough estimate of the total population of all the continents is 7,000,000,000.

Highest and lowest points on Continent

The following table lists the seven continents with their highest and lowest points on land, sorted in decreasing highest points.

Continent Highest point Height (m) Height (ft) Country or territory containing highest point Lowest point Depth (m) Depth (ft) Country or territory containing lowest point
Asia
Mount Everest
8,848 29,029  China and  Nepal Dead Sea -422 −1,384.5  Israel,  Jordan and  Palestine
South America
Aconcagua 6,960 22,830  Argentina Laguna del Carbón -105 −344.5  Argentina
North America Mount McKinley 6,198 20,335  United States Death Valley † -86 −282.2  United States
Africa Mount Kilimanjaro 5,895 19,341  Tanzania Lake Assal -155 −508.5  Djibouti
Europe Mount Elbrus 5,633 18,481  Russia Caspian Sea -28 −91.9
 Russia and, depending on the Europe-Asia boundary chosen,  Azerbaijan and/or  Kazakhstan
Antarctica Vinson Massif 4,892 16,050  Antarctica DeepLake,Vestfold Hills † -50 −164.0  Antarctica
Australia Puncak Jaya 4,884 16,024  Indonesia(Papua) Lake Eyre -15 −49.2  Australia

 

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