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Aconcagua - South America Highest Mountain


Eight Thousander Mountain on Earth ::-- 1.Mount Everest|| 2.K2 Mountain|| 3.Kangchenjunga|| 4.Lhotse Mountain|| 5.Makalu Mountain|| 6.Cho Oyu Mountain|| 7.Dhaulagiri Mountain|| 8.Manaslu Mountain|| 9.Nanga Parbat Mountain|| 10.Annapurna Mountain||11.Gasherbrum||12.Broad Peak||13.Gasherbrum Mountain||14.Shishapangma Mountain||

Seven Summits Continent wise on Earth ::--||Aconcagua (S.America)||Carstensz(Oceana)||Elbrus (Europe)||M.Evrest (Asia)||Kilimanjaro (Africa)||Mskinley (N.America)||Vinson (Antarktica)||


Aconcagua

Aconcagua is the highest mountain in the Americas at 6,962 m (22,841 ft). It is located in the Andes mountain range, in the Argentine province of Mendoza and it lies 112 kilometres (70 mi) west by north of its capital, the city of Mendoza. The summit is also located about 5 kilometres from San Juan Province and 15 kilometres from the international border with Chile. Aconcagua is the highest peak in both the Western and Southern Hemispheres. It is one of the Seven Summits.
Aconcagua is bounded by the Valle de las Vacas to the north and east and the Valle de los Horcones Inferior to the West and South. The mountain and its surroundings are part of the Aconcagua Provincial Park. The mountain has a number of glaciers. The largest glacier is the Ventisquero Horcones Inferior at about 10 km long which descends from the south face to about 3600m altitude near the Confluencia camp. Two other large glacier systems are the Ventisquero de las Vacas Sur and Glaciar Este/Ventisquero Relinchos system at about 5 km long. However the most well-known is the north-eastern or Polish Glacier, a common route of ascent.
The mountain was created by the subduction of the Nazca Plate beneath the South American plate during the geologically recent Andean orogeny; however, it is not a volcano. The origin of the name is contested; it is either from the Arauca Aconca-Hue, which refers to the Aconcagua River and means 'comes from the other side', the Quechua Ackon Cahuak, meaning 'Sentinel of Stone', or Quechua Anco Cahuac, 'White Sentinel'.



History

The first attempt on Aconcagua by a European was made in 1883 by a party led by the German geologist and explorer Paul Güssfeldt. Bribing porters with the story that there was treasure on the mountain, he approached the mountain via the Rio Volcan, making two attempts on the peak by the north-west ridge and reaching an altitude of 6,500 metres (21,300 ft). The route that he prospected is now the normal route up the mountain.
The first recorded ascent was in 1897 on a British expedition led by Edward FitzGerald. The summit was reached by the Swiss guide Matthias Zurbriggen on January 14 and by two other expedition members a few days later.
The youngest person to reach the summit of Aconcagua was Matthew Moniz of Boulder, Colorado. He was 11 years old when he reached the summit on December 16, 2008. The oldest person to climb it was Scott Lewis who reached the summit on November 26, 2007 when he was 87 years old.



Aconcagua Mountain lies west of Mendoza, argentina, entirely within Argentina, and immediately east of Argentina’s border with chile. The mountain is, at 22,834 ft (6,960 m), not only the tallest mountain in the Western Hemisphere, but also the highest outside of Asia. Its twin peaks, the northern of which is the tallest, can be seen from the coast of Chile 100 mi (162 km) away. There are different interpretations of the origin of the name Aconcagua. It may be derived from the native Quechua akun (“summit”), ka (“other”), and agua (“admired” or “feared”). Thus, it is translated from Quechua as a summit that is feared or admired. Another version is that the name is derived from Arauca roots. Thus, Aconca-Hue is a Mapuche name for the corresponding Aconcagua River that, from Chile, “comes from the other side.” The relatively new mountain was created by subduction of the Nazca plate beneath the South American plate. Geology of the Aconcagua area can be grouped in three basic time periods: a base that developed before the Jurassic period, Mesozoic sequences, and coverings from the Cenozoic period. Glaciers on Aconcagua include Lower Horcones Glacier, the Upper Horcones Glacier, the Los Polacos (or Los Relinchos) Glacier (a climbing route), and the Güssfeldt Glacier. Glaciers on Mount Aconcagua are, owing to more arid conditions, less pronounced than those to the south in Patagonia. Most of the vegetation and wildlife, because of the aridity and the short growing season at high elevations, are concentrated below 13,123 ft (4,000 m). Typical vegetation is low-growing brush (steppe) adapted to low temperatures, thin soils, and high winds. Brush species include lena amarilla, vareta, and cuerno de cabra, with grass species including huecu and coirones. Wildlife such as the condor, mora eagle, puma, and red fox migrate to lower elevations during winter. Mountain mice hibernate on site. Streams harbor chorlos, churrines, and torrent ducks. Guanacos (similar to llamas) can gather in large groups. Hares introduced from Europe are plentiful. Aconcagua Mountain is a provincial park. It was included in 1983 as part of a network of 10 protected areas of the province of Mendoza. It is designated as a Protected Wilderness Area, based on its scenic, recreational, cultural, genetic, and biodiversity values. These areas serve as a reference in relation to similar yet degraded habitats. General Don José de San Martín crossed the Andes near Aconcagua to liberate the Chilean area from the Spanish in 1817. His army of more than 5,300 men, 9,280 mules, and 1,600 horses crossed at more than 13,123 ft (4,000 m) in elevation. In 1835, Charles Darwin was one of the first European scientists to collect data about the mountain. In January 1985, a remarkable discovery was made by Argentine climbers—an Inca cemetery at 17,388 ft (5,300 m) in elevation. The site included circular stone walls, a mummy, and six statues—three human and three llama figures. Although the mountain is a large, singular massif, thus nicknamed the “Centinel del Piedra” (Stone Sentinel), various peaks around Aconcagua also surpass 16,404 ft (5,000 m).


aconcagua mountain

 

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